Veterans Day

Veterans Day

Did you know … Veterans Day was originally called Armistice Day. Armistice is a big word that means two armies at war with each other agree to stop fighting, at least for a specific amount of time. November 11, 1918 World War I was known as “the Great War” until World War II. At 11:00 am on November 11, 1918, the armies agreed to stop fighting. A Legal Holiday November 11th became a legal holiday called Armistice Day in 1938. Moment of Silence United States citizens honored soldiers of “the Great War” (World War I) with parades. They also paused for two minutes at 11 am for a moment of silence. People pray for the soldiers or think of them quietly during moments of silence. Tomb of the Unknown Soldier A World War I soldier was buried...

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Tuskegee Airmen: Amazing American Heroes

The following article was submitted by Jordan Bryson, who interviewed Joseph Gomer, a Tuskegee Airman, as part of a history project. Who were the Tuskegee Airmen? The Tuskegee Airmen, an Army Air Corps program, trained blacks to fly and maintain combat planes during World War II. It included pilots, navigators, maintenance, instructors, and all the people who kept the planes in the air. A 1925 War College Study said that blacks could not fly or maintain complicated machinery like a military airplane. In the 1940s, black men came to Tuskegee Institute in Alabama to prove the 1925 study wrong. They were very good, which opened the door for the military to be integrated (units open to everyone, regardless of race or religion). The black press spread the word about...

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Hawaii, The Aloha State

Hawaii, The Aloha State

by Sandra Merville Hart  Hawaii’s nickname is The Aloha State. The Hawaiian word ‘aloha’ means love, peace, and compassion. It is also used as a greeting and a goodbye. Of the 136 Hawaiian Islands, people live on only 7, which are: Oahu, Maui, Hawaii (The Big Island,) Kauai, Nihau, Lanai, and Molokai. Hawaii’s early history Many believe that the first people to arrive in Hawaii came from eastern Polynesia and may have traveled over 2,000 miles in long catamaran-style canoes. Captain James Cook, British explorer, came to Hawaii in 1778. The native Hawaiians were friendly at first. In 1779, Cook was killed. Diseases brought by North American and European visitors killed many islanders, who had no immunity. Hawaii became a U.S. territory in 1900. Japanese...

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