A Slave Girl Becomes a Civil War Nurse

A Slave Girl Becomes a Civil War Nurse

Did you know … Susie King Taylor was born in Georgia. Because her mother was a slave, Susie was a slave, too. She lived with her grandmother in Savannah and secretly attended school with her younger brother and sister because it was illegal for her to go to school. The Civil War Begins She was a teenager when the Civil War began in 1861. In April of 1862, Susie went with her uncle to Saint Catherine Island for the protection of the Union soldiers. Two weeks later, they were taken to Saint Simons Island, where about 600 black men, women, and children lived. Susie was then asked to lead a school for the children. Two large boxes filled with books and Bibles from the north were given to her. Around forty children attended her school. Several adults came to learn to...

Read More

Diseases Killed more Soldiers than Bullets

Diseases Killed more Soldiers than Bullets

Did you know … Some Civil War soldiers caught smallpox, a contagious and sometimes fatal disease. Susie King Taylor serves as nurse One Civil War nurse, Susie King Taylor, drank sassafras tea constantly. She believed that drinking this tea kept her blood clean, preventing her from catching smallpox. This was a common belief in Civil War times. Sassafras tea may have helped Susie remain strong Even today, many people claim that sassafras tea is a blood purifier (cleanser), but there’s no evidence that it kept Susie from catching this disease. Cases of varioloid, which is form of smallpox, broke out among some of the soldiers. One soldier had an extremely serious case of the disease. He was separated from others and placed in his own tent. To prevent others from...

Read More