Nebraska, the Cornhusker State

Nebraska, the Cornhusker State

by Sandra Merville Hart Nebraska’s nickname is The Cornhusker State. Farmers used to hold cornhusking contests. The University of Nebraska chose a Cornhusker as its mascot, which the state afterward adopted as its nickname. The Otoe called the Platte River “Nebrathka,” which means “flat water.” The Omaha name for the river was “Ni-ubthatka,” or “spreading water.” The French called it Platte River, meaning “flat.” The early history of Nebraska The Omaha, Dakotas, and the Pawnee lived in what is now known as Nebraska long before any white settlers arrived. Spain claimed it in 1541 and then France in 1682. Neither built permanent settlements. Though Bellevue became the first permanent settlement in 1822, most pioneers simply traveled the Oregon...

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Arbor Day

Arbor Day

J. Sterling Morton, a settler in the NebraskaTerritory, understood the need to plant trees on the prairie which was being turned into farmland. Trees provided shade, logs for the fire, lumber for buildings, and windbreaks. First Arbor Day Celebrated in Nebraska Morton planted orchards and shade trees on his farm. He asked his neighbors to plant trees on their property, too. Then Morton had a great idea. He wanted a special day devoted to planting trees. On April 10, 1872, America’s first Arbor Day was celebrated in Nebraska. Over one million trees were planted. Annual Holiday in Nebraska In 1885, Nebraska made Arbor Day an annual event. Celebrated by All Fifty States People plant trees on Arbor Day. All fifty states celebrate Arbor Day, but on different...

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