Montana, The Treasure State

Montana, The Treasure State

by Sandra Merville Hart Montana’s nickname is The Treasure State for its rich mineral reserves, including the nation’s most valuable gemstone, sapphire. The early history of Montana The Louisiana Purchase of 1803 opened up Montana to explorers who drew maps of the land. Fur-trading companies traveled to Montana and built a trading post on the Bighorn River. Montana became the Montana Territory in 1864, which meant citizens elected their legislature. Discovery of gold Prospectors traveled to Montana at the discovery of gold in 1862.  Bannack City (originally Bannack) was the first boomtown established that same year. Miners and prospectors came at every rumor of gold. Quickly built towns prospered until all the gold had been mined. Most miners left boomtowns...

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Denali National Park

Denali National Park

Denali National Park is located in Alaska and is the home of Mount McKinley. At 20,320 feet, this is North America’s tallest peak. The park was established in 1917 and is about the size of Massachusetts. Denali Park Road The Denali Park Road, ninety-two miles long, is the only road in the park. The first fifteen miles leads to Savage River and is paved. There are many places to stop and take pictures. If it’s not cloudy, you can see the snowy Mount McKinley after driving nine miles on the park road. Tour buses  Denali Park Road turns into a gravel road after the fifteen mile marker. Visitors can take shuttle buses, tour buses, or courtesy buses to go farther along the road. The tour buses include guides that share information about the park. Huskies...

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Glacier National Park

Glacier National Park

Glacier National Park, established in 1910, is located in western Montana. About 2,000,000 tourists visit the park every year. Crown of the continent The park earned the name of “crown of the continent” for the glaciers still found in the area as well as the majestic mountains, beautiful forests and meadows, and turquoise lakes. Many come to hike the 700 miles of adventurous trails.   Lake McDonald is the largest lake in the park The largest lake in the park is Lake McDonald where visitors can swim, boat, or fish. There’s also white-water-rafting on the Middle Fork Flathead River. Thirteen campgrounds There are thirteen campgrounds in Glacier and five of them are located along the Going-to-the-Sun Road. Families can also stay at Rising Sun,...

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Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone National Park may be the world’s most famous park, but it is definitely the oldest national park. It was established in 1872. 96% of the park is in Wyoming; the rest is in Idaho and Montana. Over 300 geysers and hot springs Yellowstone National Park is larger than Delaware and Rhode Island combined. Over 3,600,000 visitors come every year to see over 300 geysers and hot springs. In fact there are more geysers and hot springs in the park than anywhere else on earth. Old Faithful The most famous geyser is Old Faithful, which erupts at intervals of 60 to 110 minutes. The geyser reaches a height of 106 to 184 feet and the eruptions last from one and half minutes to five minutes. Have your camera ready to snap an impressive photo like the one from...

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