Happy Easter! Jesus Loves You!

Happy Easter! Jesus Loves You!

Click on the image of Jesus and the children below to print and color this sheet.

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The Road to Jerusalem: Palm Sunday

The Road to Jerusalem: Palm Sunday

On Palm Sunday, we celebrate the day Jesus was in a parade. He road a young donkey and people lined the streets shouting, “Blessed is the king who comes in the name of the Lord!” The streets were dirty and hot, so everyone waved palm leaves and put their coats on the ground for the donkey to walk on. Everyone was so happy that Jesus had come to Jerusalem.

Click on Read More below to print, color and work the maze on this sheet.

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The Story of St. Patrick

The Story of St. Patrick

March 17th is celebrated each year as St. Patrick’s Day. This is a special day in Ireland because it celebrates the life of St. Patrick who brought the story of Jesus to their country. One of the things St. Patrick used to tell the Irish about God was a shamrock. He told them the three leaves of the shamrock represented the Trinity. That helped them understand and the shamrock became a symbol for St. Patrick.

The jigsaw puzzle below is of a shamrock. To play it, just click and hold on the pieces then slide them into place. If you can’t see or play the puzzle below, click on the image at the bottom of the post to go to the jigsaw puzzle website.

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Being Patient is Hard

Being Patient is Hard

Therefore, as God’s chosen people, holy and dearly loved, clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience. Colossians 3:12   by Penny L. Hunt   “Can I have a cookie?” Mom peeked in the cookie jar. “Uh-oh. It’s empty again. I’ll have to make more.” “But that takes a long time. I want a cookie now.” Mom looked at the recipe card and shook her head.      “I need more eggs. We’ll  have to go to the store.” “I don’t want to go to the store. I want a cookie.” Frowning, I folded my arms. Mom rubbed my shoulder. “I know. Be patient. It won’t take long.” We went to the store and bought the eggs. I kept wishing we were already back home. Soon we were, and I helped add the ingredients for the...

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Irish Scones: A St. Patrick’s Day Tradition

Irish Scones: A St. Patrick’s Day Tradition

By Renee McCausey     When my children were little I made special breakfasts on certain holidays.  I bought holiday themed glasses or mugs at the dollar store and sometimes filled them with candy or pencils for school.  For St. Patrick’s Day, I would make Irish Scones and sprinkle green sugar on top.  I  also purchased Irish cream coffee creamer and let them have “coffee” for breakfast.  This created special memories for my kids growing up that they still talk about.  Even as they get older, I keep these traditions. They always remind me to follow them every year. What you will need to create a memory: Irish Scones (recipe follows) You can also purchase biscuits, crescent rolls, pancakes, or waffles and sprinkle the sugar on before baking...

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St. Patrick was not Irish

St. Patrick was not Irish

Did you know … In 387 AD, Maewyn Succat, who later became known as St. Patrick, was born to Roman parents in Kilpatrick, Scotland. Ireland was called Hibernia in those days. Kidnapped Raiders from Hibernia kidnapped Maewyn when he turned sixteen. Miliuc bought him as a slave to tend his sheep. For six years, Maewyn lived a difficult life as a shepherd. He learned to speak Gaelic, the Irish language. He prayed to God many times. Sometimes he prayed all night. He became a strong Christian. Maewyn escapes One day a voice told him that he would soon return home. He walked 200 miles to the sea and boarded a ship. Eventually he went to France and became a priest. After he became a bishop, the pope gave him a new name, Patricius, Latin for Patrick. Go back to...

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Braided Easter Egg Bread

Braided Easter Egg Bread

Hey Kids:   Easter is only a few weeks away. This would be a great opportunity to make Braided Easter Egg Bread. You can watch the yeast change and grow the flour as well as present an unusual loaf of great tasting bread on your Easter table. There are many opportunities to use this bread as a witnessing tool as friends and family talk about the reason for Easter. Making bread is a lot like playing with play dough. After mixing the recipe, kneading is folding, pushing, folding, and pushing over and over to make sure the gluten is stretchy. That’s not exactly a good technical, scientific explanation, but the dough will look and feel stretchy. After the dough rises to double it’s original size, punch it down and cut the dough in half. Play dough time...

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