Making Sugar in the Early 1800s

Making Sugar in the Early 1800s

Did you know … by Sandra Merville Hart Maple or sugar trees provided sugar for early pioneers in the early 1800s. Sugar Camps They built log huts called Sugar Camps near maple trees. Neighborhood camps were often built near each other to allow friends to talk during the long process. Sap boiled in iron kettles Pioneers collected gallons of sap. They boiled the collected sap, or “sugar water,” in iron kettles. The children loved it, because it often continued all night. They played with children from neighboring camps while the sap boiled down. Sap made several forms of sugar Sap first made a waxy form of sugar and many people ate it that way. It granulated, or became like the little crystals you see in the sugar bowl, when it boiled longer. Sap...

Read More

Crater Lake National Park

Crater Lake National Park

by Sandra Merville Hart Crater Lake National Park, established in 1902, is a picturesque lake surrounded by two-thousand foot high cliffs in the state of Oregon. This unusual lake was formed by a volcanic eruption over 7,500 years ago. At 1,943 feet deep, it is the deepest lake in the United States. The water is almost entirely rain and melted snow, making it a beautiful blue color that fills visitors with wonder. About 533 inches of snow (44 feet) fall every year at Crater Lake. The biggest snowfall was 879 inches (73 feet) in 1932-33. The snow usually melts by August. Fish were added to the lake but only two species survived: Rainbow Trout and Kokanee Salmon. Fishing is encouraged and no license is required. There is a volcano called Mt. Mazama in the park. You...

Read More

Historic Meaning of Flowers

Historic Meaning of Flowers

Did you know …   Flowers used to contain symbolic meanings. For example, when a man sent a yellow tulip to a lady, she knew it meant he was hopelessly in love with her. Certain flowers had different meanings A secret admirer might send yellow chrysanthemums. Forget-me-nots were a reminder to always remember the one sending them. Pink carnations were a symbol of a mother’s undying love. Different colors of the same flower could mean different things. Red roses were for love while pink roses meant friendship or appreciation. Gardenias, yellow roses, and yellow carnations brought thoughts of joy or cheerfulness. Specific colors have meaning Even the color of flowers took on a specific meaning. A bouquet of purple flowers might celebrate success. Blue...

Read More

Mother of the American Valentine

Did you know … In 1848, Esther Howland’s family owned a large book and stationery story in Worcester, Massachusetts. She asked her father to order lace paper and other supplies. She used paper flowers with the lace paper and colored paper to create beautiful designs for valentines. Her brother, a salesman, took a dozen sample valentines on his next sales trip. People loved the designs It shocked Esther when he returned with advance orders over $5,000. She recruited help from her friends to fill the orders in a kind of all-girl assembly line. Esther designed the cards. One lady cut pictures while another created the background. Someone else added more decorations. More cards ordered More orders came. Esther hired more assistants to help fill them. It...

Read More

Groundhog Day

Groundhog Day

Did you know …   Groundhog Day falls on February 2nd, the same day as Candlemas Day, a Christian holiday also called “Feast of the Presentation of Christ in the Temple.” Candlemas After Jesus was born, Mary waited forty days to present Jesus at the temple in Jerusalem, the time required by the Law of Moses in Leviticus 12. To remember Jesus’ presentation, for centuries Christians attended services where candles were lit and blessed on February 2nd. As this day is about halfway between the beginning of winter and the beginning of spring, folks began to search for signs of spring on this day. Germans watched for a badger to cast a shadow. If it did, there would be six more weeks of winter. Old English saying: If Candlemas be fair and...

Read More

Old Time Jobs – Shoemakers

Old Time Jobs – Shoemakers

Did you know …   In the early 1800s, the village tanner prepared leather from cattle hides. Families gave this leather to the shoemaker to make new shoes. Shoemakers stayed with the family When the country shoemaker received word that a family was ready for new shoes, he brought his shoe bench and tool kit. He lived with the family until finishing all the shoes needed for winter. Children owned one pair of shoes Children usually received one new pair of shoes a year. Many boys and girls chose to walk barefooted in the summer. Not wearing shoes all summer toughened the children’s feet. They might run on stony ground without hurting their feet. Few men owned boots Boys didn’t wear boots. Few men owned boots. Wealthy farmers bought shoes from...

Read More